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Nomads donate blood, save lives

Nomads donate blood, save lives

From left, U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tyrese Baylis, 33rd Maintenance Squadron, low observables aircraft structural maintenance journeyman, and Master Sgt. Travis Bulay, 33rd Maintenance Squadron aircrew ground equipment flight chief, donates blood on the Big Red Bus Sept. 17, 2021 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Baylis and Bulay donated blood as part of a blood drive held by the 33rd Maintenance Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Heather LeVeille)

Nomads donate blood, save lives

From left, U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Karissa Rodriguez, 96th Test Wing public affairs officer, and Airman Leandra Garcia, 33rd Fighter Wing public affairs apprentice, fill out a medical checklist prior to donating blood Sept. 17, 2021 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Donors received wellness checkups prior to donating, which included blood pressure, temperature check, iron count, pulse check, and cholesterol screening. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Heather LeVeille)

Nomads donate blood, save lives

A OneBlood member inserts a needle into the vein of a donor, U.S. Air Force Airman Leandra Garcia, 33rd Fighter Wing public affairs apprentice, Sept. 17, 2021 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Blood is made up of four main components: red blood cells, platelets, plasma and white blood cells. Each whole blood donation has the potential to save up to three lives. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Heather LeVeille)

Nomads donate blood, save lives

A OneBlood member explains the blood donation process to U.S. Air Force Airman Leandra Garcia, 33rd Fighter Wing public affairs apprentice, Sept. 17, 2021 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Garcia made a whole blood donation. Whole blood donation is the traditional way of donating where technicians draw a pint of blood containing red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and plasma at one time. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Heather LeVeille)

Nomads donate blood, save lives

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Travis Bulay, 33rd Maintenance Squadron aircrew ground equipment flight chief, donates blood on the Big Red Bus Sept. 17, 2021 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. When donating double red blood cells the donation service only collects red blood cells and not platelets or plasma. This type of donation is done using a process called automation, also known as apheresis. Automated technology allows donors to give twice the amount of their red cells than compared to a whole blood donation. Automation enables collection of only the most needed components of the donor’s blood. Red blood cells are the most transfused blood product. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Heather LeVeille)

Nomads donate blood, save lives

A OneBlood member releases tubes from U.S. Air Force Airman Leandra Garcia, 33rd Fighter Wing public affairs apprentice, Sept. 17, 2021 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Twenty-one people donated with a result of nineteen usable units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Heather LeVeille)

Nomads donate blood, save lives

From left, U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Karissa Rodriguez, 96th Test Wing public affairs officer, and Airman Leandra Garcia, 33rd Fighter Wing public affairs apprentice, prepare to donate blood on the Big Red Bus Sept. 17, 2021 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Rodriguez and Garcia donated blood as part of a blood drive held by the 33rd Maintenance Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Heather LeVeille)

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

The 33rd Maintenance Squadron held a blood drive Sept. 16, 2021 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Twenty-one Airmen across the 33rd Fighter Wing donated blood, potentially saving 57 lives. (U.S. Air Force photos by Senior Airman Heather LeVeille)