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33rd FW continues to train the world's finest

F-35A Lightning II

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Zackery Hendrix, 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, directs a pilot to the runway at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. Crew chiefs ensure the aircraft is ready to fly at a moment’s notice so pilots can safely and effectively complete their mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II

An F-35A Lightning II pilot prepares for a flight at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The F-35A is designed to achieve unprecedented levels of reliability and maintainability, combined with a highly responsive support and training system linked with the latest in information technology. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Richard Medina, 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, closes a panel on the F-3A Lighting II at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. Crew chiefs use automated technical data to diagnose and solve maintenance problems. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II

An F-35A Lightning II flies through the sky at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The F-35A’s advanced sensor package is designed to gather, fuse and distribute more information than any fighter in history, giving operators a decisive advantage over all adversaries. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II

An F-35A Lightning II pilot prepares for a flight at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The F-35’s helmet mounted display system is an advanced system that allows the pilot to see all of the intelligence and targeting information displayed directly onto the helmet’s visor. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Brenden Roehrig, 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, removes the wheel chocks at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. Crew chiefs ensure the aircraft is ready to fly at a moment’s notice so pilots can safely and effectively complete their mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II

An F-35A Lightning II takes off at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The F-35 contains state-of-the-art tactical data links that provide the secure sharing of data among its flight members as well as other airborne, surface and ground-based platforms required to perform assigned missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II

An F-35A Lightning II pilot prepares for a flight at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The F-35’s helmet mounted display system is an advanced system that allows the pilot to see all of the intelligence and targeting information displayed directly onto the helmet’s visor. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Zackery Hendrix, 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, renders a hand salute after marshalling an F-35A Lightning II off of the parking ramp prior to takeoff at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The salute signifies a transfer of control from ground crew to air crew. The crew chief is letting the pilot know that he is leaving with a good jet and the pilot is informing the crew chief that he will take good care of the jet and will return it safely. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II
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An F-35A Lightning II pilot prepares for a flight at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The F-35A is designed to achieve unprecedented levels of reliability and maintainability, combined with a highly responsive support and training system linked with the latest in information technology. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II
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An F-35A Lightning II flies through the sky at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The F-35A can reach speeds of 1,200 miles per hour and can fly for 1,350 miles with internal fuel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II
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An F-35A Lightning II pilot prepares for a flight at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. U.S. Air Force pilots fly approximately 200 hours per year and learn extensive amounts of information about their aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Zackery Hendrix, 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, directs a pilot during a preflight inspection at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. Crew chiefs use hand signals to communicate with the pilot when audio capability is unavailable. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II
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An F-35A Lightning II takes off at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. The F-35A is an agile, versatile, high-performance, 9g capable multirole fighter that combines stealth, sensor fusion, and unprecedented situational awareness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

F-35A Lightning II
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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Zackery Hendrix, 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, stands at ease during a preflight inspection at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. Crew chiefs ensure the aircraft is ready to fly at a moment’s notice so pilots can safely and effectively complete their mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. --

The 58th Fighter Squadron and the 33rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron accomplish their training mission at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, July 30, 2020. New work schedules and remodeled procedures allow the training to continue while ensuring the safety of Airmen due to COVID-19. (U.S. Air Force photos by Airman 1st Class Heather Leveille)